In the days before their scheduled starts, Dodgers pitchers receive data packets that colorfully display opposing hitters' averages and slugging percentages against each pitch in each area. Ross Stripling likes to check those numbers against video evidence. If a hitter only has tallied a.400 average on sliders down and away because of bloop hits over second base, he notes that. "I don't care about average," Stripling said. This being 2018, Stripling is not unique in that regard. He knows other pitchers do the same, probably some in more advanced ways. He knows that hitters will catch up, perhaps whenever the long-discussed virtual-reality machines are able to.....

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How this new data can be used, and who has access to it, has quickly become the most contested aspect of wearable technology in baseball.

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How this new data can be used, and who has access to it, has quickly become the most contested aspect of wearable technology in baseball.

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