So after the club acquired Roberto Osuna for Ken Giles at the deadline, columnist Lance Zierlein was well justified when he wrote that "[t]here is no way the Astros haven't done their homework on Osuna. Roberto Osuna's lawyer speaking about the word "Remorseful" that was used by the Astros in reference to their new reliever: "My client is not remorseful of being guilty of any criminal activity," Basile said Wednesday. Osuna could end up in the same boat, because domestic-violence crimes can be considered "Crimes of moral turpitude" that bar a person from entry into the United States. So it's a pretty big risk that the Astros assumed when they dealt for him, because there's a realistic chance Osuna loses his visa and can't pitch for them if he's found to have committed such a crime. So there are two big questions here: first, what did Osuna actually do? And second, what law did he violate? As to the first, even the Astros, for all their due diligence, don't seem to know - or won't suggest as much publicly. So this may come down to two things we don't know: under what law Osuna ends up being convicted or pleading guilty, and what he actually did. It's surprising, given just how important the details are, that the Astros acquired Osuna without seeming to know what happened.

More from Domestic Violence

The Other Side of a Roberto Osuna Trade

Roberto Osuna just got the third-longest domestic violence suspension in MLB history. Why are …

Is Major League Baseball’s Domestic Violence Policy Working?

It's time to reexamine MLB's Domestic Violence Policy …

Roberto Osuna, the Blue Jays, and the Limits of Presuming Innocence

What nobody noticed is the difference in how the Blue Jays handled it …