Last week, San Diego Padres left-hander Jose Torres was suspended for 100 games for violating MLB's Domestic Violence Policy. Torres represents the ninth major leaguer to be investigated under the policy and the seventh to be suspended since the policy took effect at the beginning of the 2016 season, joining Aroldis Chapman, Jose Reyes, Hector Olivera, Jeurys Familia, Derek Norris, and Steven Wright. While those numbers may be relatively small, especially compared to PED suspensions, domestic violence is an entirely different animal because it is not, unlike PEDs, what might be termed a "Victimless crime." Domestic violence and domestic abuse have real victims who often suffer real - and often severe - physical and emotional injuries. As Cindy Southworth, the executive vice president of the National Network to End Domestic Violence told USA Today, neither works at all well as the basis for a domestic-violence policy. What happened to his foregone salary? With nothing in the CBA or domestic violence policy requiring otherwise, that money stayed in the Rockies' coffers, to be spent as the team saw fit, and almost assuredly not on abuse treatment and prevention. What about rehabilitation? The Domestic Violence policy does provide for treatment and classes for offenders, but they don't always seem to be all that effective. There's a flip side to that, which is that the wealth and opportunities facilitated by a major-league career probably aren't best served to benefit domestic abusers, and unrepentant domestic abusers seem to create an even bigger problem.

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