At the time, I wrote that the Mariners appeared to be bucking a trend by foregoing public money for a new stadium in favor of staying where they were. The Mariners say they will only sign their lease extension deal with Safeco Field if King County approves $180 million in public funding for the ballpark. "Fred Rivera, a Mariners executive vice president and the team's legal counsel, said Wednesday that the lease deal would be signed only if the county approves the public funding for the ballpark." I am a season ticket holder and I do not think the Mariners need $180 million in public funding. Here, it's important to note that the Mariners' demand for public funding isn't actually new: in fact, it's part of the proposed lease contract that was originally agreed to back in May. As Tim Cantu, an attorney, correctly noted for Lookout Landing,. The Mariners aren't making a last-minute demand for new money here; they're asking that the County pay what the County said it would pay as a condition of the Mariners signing a new lease. That doesn't mean the Mariners would leave if the public funding is rejected.

More from Analysis

MLB has its own spin on the "positionless" trends found in other sports.

What is the best technique for measuring spin …

Jayson Werth says Scott Boras didn't call teams on his behalf. Boras says he …